Oregon delegate Solomon Yue makes WSJ quote on GOP revolt

Oregon GOP National Committeeman Solomon Yue made the Wall Street Journal notable quotables today (see bottom):

John Fund writing in the Journal’s Political Diary e-newsletter:

The Republican National Committee, which consists of two representatives from every state and territory, is technically the governing body of the Republican Party. In reality, it has normally been a rubber-stamp for the incumbent president whenever the White House is in GOP hands. . . .But the debacle of the last two election cycles, coupled with an increasingly erratic set of policy choices by the Bush White House, is finally prompting a mini-revolt. A group of RNC members has initiated a special meeting to hear presentations from the six candidates running for the job of chairman. Even more significantly, the RNC’s vice chairman and other officials are sponsoring a resolution that will oppose the Bush White House’s support of seemingly bottomless bailouts for Wall Street and the auto industry.

“We can’t be a party of small government, free markets and low taxes while supporting bailouts and nationalizing industries, which lead to big government, socialism and high taxes at the expense of individual liberty and freedoms,” Solomon Yue of Oregon, a cosponsor of the resolution, told the Washington Times. The resolution was written by James Bopp, a noted constitutional law attorney who is the RNC’s national vice chairman. “Articulating a political philosophy is equally important as applying it consistently,” says Mr. Yue. “Failing to do so, we have today’s identity crisis, which resulted in our losses in 2006 and 2008.” The resolution is scheduled to be presented during the RNC’s next general meeting in Washington D.C., which will be held between January 28 and 30.

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