Job Creation Shouldn’t Be Our Goal

The next time someone argues that we need government to “create jobs,” show him or her this three-minute video. Then show it to them again, and again, until they grasp the concept:


Steve Buckstein is senior policy analyst and founder at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization.

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Posted by at 05:10 | Posted in Economy, Jobs, Uncategorized | Tagged | 4 Comments |Email This Post Email This Post |Print This Post Print This Post
  • ardbeg

    Once upon a time we had guy’s like BobHope. Jonny Cash and Steve Jobs. Now days we have no hope, no cash and no jobs.

    • Kaye Nein

      Perhaps ardbeg’s comment might fit in the Kitzhaber balloon attending the preceding Oregon Watchdog cartoon blog. Thereto, the Zennist might reply: “There there Pilgrim, rest assured
      Obamacares!”

  • JacklordGod

    Nice video, and it is an interesting take arguing job destruction is vital to economic growth. The problem is I think farms, or really any large segment of the economy will always be a bad example with the left. They will always argue some form of corporate perversion of that segment of the economy, thus poor example, thus no conclusions can be drawn from it. They will argue this even if they have been the ones advocated for such corperate perversion of that segment of the economy.

    For example – with farming the left sees that segment of the economy as particularly one where government has conspired with giant agribusiness to run the small family farm out of business. To some extent they are right, that is exactly how farm policy has worked in this country since the New Deal. However governments massive involvement with agriculture has been precisely because the left wanted that involvement. Obviously it is a loaded term, but our agricultural economy is largely based on the fascist model. Government control of privately owned business either through direct control or market manipulation. Rex Tugwell, a Roosevelt administration senior member, largely developed this approach and was an early and open admirer of fascism when it was considered the political zeitgeist of the left in the 30’s.

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