As ObamaCare Turns Four, How’s It Working out for You?

coveroregon_busshelter_man_thbBy Steve Buckstein

The Affordable Care Act turned four years recently So how’s it working out for you? If you’re one of the millions who lost, or risk losing, the insurance you already had, your answer is probably “not so great.”

If you’re a young person who realizes that ObamaCare wants you to pay much higher insurance premiums to subsidize older and sicker Americans, your answer is probably “not so great” also.

Not even considering the HealthCare.gov website disaster, and the totally dysfunctional Cover Oregon website debacle, it appears there may be more people losing their health insurance coverage than have gained new coverage under this deeply flawed law.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that the law will cause the equivalent of two million jobs to be lost by 2017.

The 2013 PolitiFact Lie of the Year was President Obama’s oft told fib that “If you like your health care plan you can keep it.”

When the first ObamaCare open enrollment period ends on March 31, its flaws will be hard to gloss over. Rather than carve out even more exemptions to the law, the administration should admit that they got it wrong. Then we can have an honest discussion about how to move toward real insurance reform using market principles that offer true affordable alternatives to the Affordable Care Act, which has proven anything but.

Steve Buckstein is founder and Senior Policy Analyst at Cascade Policy Institute, Oregon’s free market public policy research organization.

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Posted by at 05:00 | Posted in Health Care Reform, Obamacare | Tagged , , , , | 41 Comments |Email This Post Email This Post |Print This Post Print This Post
  • Britt Storkson

    The Obamacare websites don’t work because they don’t have to. Obamacare has little to do with delivering health care. Obamacare is nothing more than a wealth-transfer scheme to transfer money from the working class to the ruling class who paid for this Obamanation legislation with campaign contributions.

  • Bob Clark

    What is ObamaCare? Probably its biggest feature is it’s an abrogation of Congress’s role in governance, leaving government healthcare lawmaking entirely to the discretion of the sitting U.S President. ObamaCare should have been struck down by the courts just for this simple abrogation of duties of Congress under the U.S Constitution. ObamaCare can be twisted any which way by the sitting President because it is full of exceptions and administrative interpretation. A GOP president unless Congress is fully in control by the Democrats could gut its mandates and open up federal health exchanges so as to offer health insurance across state lines. Or, the broad power to grant exceptions, could allow a GOP president to simply to except everyone from any of ObamaCare’s parameters, effectively killing ObamaCare.

    • DavidAppell

      Civics review: Congress drafts and passes laws. The Executive branch executes them.

      • David, while your civics review is right on, you might want to share it with the White House. At last count there have been at least 38 significant changes to the ACA since its passag in 2010, and at least 21 of those changes were made unilaterally by the President.
        source: http://www.galen.org/newsletters/changes-to-obamacare-so-far/

      • .

        Well shoot, Gary Gilmore’s execution turned out better for US than POTUS BAMA and CJ SCOTUS ROBERTS bobble heading their shlock and load of buckshot at executing the the noxious varmint, aka, ACA.
        ‘Tis certain Roy Rogers Trigger wouldn’t have been rattled by the snake in the morass. Neither would Moses Heston hesitate to roundup the refer madness.

  • Jack Lord God

    How’s it working out for me? It sucks, and my situation is better than most when it comes to getting screwed by Obamacare. Since Obamacare was initially passed my insurance rose from roughly $200 a month to $300 a month over the span of three years or so. Last October my plan went up an additional $50 when Obamacare final provisions went in.

    The first go round was idiotic but ok, my insurance did give me more (not that I wanted it) so the $100 jump did get me something. Mostly a cap on out of pocket expenses.

    The $50 jump was bullshit. Do I blame my insurance company? No, Over the course of two decades prior they had never raised my premium by more than a few dollars.

    Even if I excuse the $100 jump because I did get something for it, the $50 jump still adds up to an extra $600 per year thanks to this idiotic Obamacare.

    Now we all know what the standard model THX1138 liberal drone will say “you have a problem with greedy insurance companies, not Obamacare, they are the ones who jacked your rates”

    Nonsense, they hadn’t jacked my rates really at all for 20 years until this idiocy came along. When I went to the Cover Oregon site, the closest plan I could get cost $100 more per month and offered less.

    This is asinine. Katherine Sebelius clearly isn’t qualified to be secretary of the local bridge club and Obama couldn’t meet payroll on a lemonade stand if his life depended on it.

    We have given some of the most profoundly unqualified people imaginable far more power than they ever should be trusted with. No wonder this is the most secretive administration in history.

    • Marion Co

      “The $50 jump was bullshit. Do I blame my insurance company? No, Over the course of two decades prior they had never raised my premium by more than a few dollars.”

      Wow! You should feel quite fortunate, I’ve seen my health care costs increase almost 100% in the last 2 decades.

      • Eric Blair

        LOL, yeah, seems a little unbelievable huh? Especially since rise in medical costs has been noted as a serious problem.

  • Michael Hagmeier

    Many of the people who “lost” their insurance found another policy that was equivalent or even better. Many people have better policies for less cost. i’ve talked to people who now have insurance for the first time in their adult lives.

    You don’t hear much about those cases from the anti-Affordable Care Act crowd.

    If you’re a young person able to stay on your parents’ policy until you’re 26, then the ACA is probably working out very well for you.

    The “HealthCare.gov disaster” is overblown. The site will come very close to signing up the projected number.

    People who couldn’t get health insurance before because of their medical conditions can now get coverage. Insurance companies can no longer cancel policies when people get sick. Do people here actually support repealing those provisions?

    “ObamaCare” isn’t perfect, that’s for sure, but it beats the hell out of BoehnerDoesn’tCare.

    I’m all for an honest discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the Affordable Care Act, but this article does nothing to advance that discussion.

    • This article “does nothing to advance” an honest discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the ACA?” You can say the same for the President’s own site.
      http://www.barackobama.com/health-care/

      • Eric Blair

        The “what about you” argument. Pretty effective in the 6th grade, not so much now. Evidently Michael hit a nerve since you didn’t disagree with his assessment. C’mon Steve, you’re better than that.

      • Michael Hagmeier

        Steve, can you address the points I made? Or would you rather play the “I know you are, but what am I?” game?

    • Jack Lord God

      >Many of the people who “lost” their insurance found another policy that was equivalent or even better.

      I am sure that is true. However if you are going to try and maintain that number is higher than the number who lost and had to pay more, good luck.

      >Many people have better policies for less cost.

      I am sure so. But so what? One can hardly maintain that is the majority experience. If it were Obamas job approval wouldn’t be in the low 40’s, Obamacare would not have held steady as being unpopular among the majority, and Republicans would be running from bringing up Obamacare with Democrats jumping on the bandwagon to assert their support for it. Instead the exact opposite is true.

      >The “HealthCare.gov disaster” is overblown. The site will come very close to signing up the projected number.

      Unlikely it is overblown. The 7 Million number was the bare minimum needed to keep Obamacare solvent. If it is reached, it will be by a hair. Frankly the administrations secretiveness on who has actually paid, which is the real number to watch, is hardly encouraging. If 7M sign up and they are mostly elderly or medicaid you have a disaster.

      >Do people here actually support repealing those provisions?

      Yes, it is reasonable to assume people who don’t support Obamacare essentially want to kill people.

      >”ObamaCare” isn’t perfect, that’s for sure, but it beats the hell out of BoehnerDoesn’tCare.

      Unlikely. Obamacare has never been popular with the majority. Democrats will not regain the House and stand poised to lose the Senate. If Obamacare beat the hell out of what we had before, this situation would not attend.

      >I’m all for an honest discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of
      the Affordable Care Act, but this article does nothing to advance that
      discussion.

      I doubt very much you are interested in advancing the discussion if you cannot admit Obamacare represents failed policy. When a presidents signature achievement, with a more than pliant press fails to have majority approval in just about every single poll since inception, and you cannot admit a mistake, an honest discussion is the last thing you are interested in.

      • Eric Blair

        “I doubt very much you are interested in advancing the discussion if you cannot admit Obamacare represents failed policy.”
        So, there can be no advancing the discussion unless the premise is accepted that the ACA is a failed policy? That is a really bizarre statement. I get that you believe it is a failed policy. I’m not thrilled, myself, with many parts of it. But to assume that the starting point needs to be your contention is nothing more than pure ego and hubris. What an odd statement. What an odd fellow you are.

        • Jack Lord God

          >So, there can be no advancing the discussion unless the premise is accepted that the ACA is a failed policy?

          Pretty much. You have a bill that has never had majority popularity since inception and is something virtually no politician wants his name attached to in the upcoming election cycle.

          At this point, not to admit Obamacare is failed policy is to still be insisting there are WMD’s in Iraq. At some point you have to just be honest and admit you made a mistake.

          > But to assume that the starting point needs to be your contention is nothing more than pure ego and hubris.

          The starting point is every politician who wants to be re elected is distancing themselves from Obamacare, it clearly is dragging the president down to low popularity, and has never had majority support.

          Yet you attach my contention to “ego and hubris”? I am afraid you don’t know what those words mean.

          • Eric Blair

            The point at which you declare that someone is not advancing the conversation because they disagree with your central premise is hubris and ego. I think I have a very good idea of what those words mean, and I see them in action in your comments, and the way you attempt to shut down discussion in your attempt to frame the debate.

      • Michael Hagmeier

        What are your solutions to the following problems:

        1. People who can’t get insurance at all, because of so-called “pre-existing conditions.”

        2. People who have paid their health insurance premiums for years, then have their policies cancelled when they get sick.

        3. People filing for bankruptcy when they get sick.

        To greater and lesser degrees, the Affordable Care Act addresses these issues. It’s one thing to criticize the existing policy, but what do propose as an alternative?

        • redbean

          Solutions abound. A good place to start is by clicking the link in the last paragraph of the article (“real insurance reform”). The piece it links to specifically explains why the ACA contains a “bait-and-switch” when it comes to covering pre-existing conditions.

        • Jack Lord God

          >It’s one thing to criticize the existing policy, but what do propose as an alternative?

          Sorry, flawed logical construct via false premise.

          The fact that I do not know who killed Colonel Mustard in the Library with the Wrench does not make your assertion that is was Miss Scarlett correct by default.

          A drunk who grabs the wheel doesn’t get a pass by asserting no one else was willing to drive.

  • Shirley

    I love it! I pay nothing and get all the health care I need. I get free massages, too, as I just tell the doc I am hurting. I get all sorts of meds for free, too. If it wasn’t for this program I could not have quit my job at Peets to work on my art and writing.

  • DavidAppell

    “RAND Corp, a non-profit think tank, dealt the death blow Monday in a new analysis reported by the Los Angeles Times. The study concluded that less than 1 million people were now uninsured because their previous coverage had been canceled and they hadn’t signed up for a new health plan. The Times estimated that about 9.5 million previously uninsured people had gotten covered.”

    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/dc/gop-obamacare-7-million

  • Myke

    The biggest problem with this law is that it doesn’t take into account of where the money to pay for premiums is supposed to come from. Our budget is stretched to the breaking point. We don’t get government subsidies, hand outs, or welfare, of which we are OK with. We pay our own way, and do with what we can work with. For that we are now punished in order to provide for someone else what we can barely provide for ourselves.

    Here’s a novel idea. How about providing incentives that actually promote economic grow in the economy, instead of taxing it into an abyss. “If you want less of something, tax it.”

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