Executive Club Wed. Jan 6th: Gregg Clapper on his vindication

Clapper Gregg hunting Executive Club Wed. Jan 6th: Gregg Clapper on his vindicationExecutive Club Meeting
6:00 pm, Wed, Jan. 6th
Portland Airport Shilo
Featuring Gregg Clapper on his legal victory

It has been nearly five long years since we saw the headlines that the Oregon State Police had charged our compatriots Mark Hemstreet and Gregg Clapper with an incredible number of hunting crimes. After two long years, all the charges were dismissed. Since that day, the two fought back every way they could, finally suing the State Police for malicious prosecution. After three more years our heroes were paid a settlement of $300,000 and one of the state troopers was disciplined.

Be at the January meeting and hear the outdoorsy Clapper (pictured, with a large friend who appears to be sleeping) tell the inside story of the whole bizarre experience. Even the most cynical of us who already have low opinion of government bureaucracies will be shocked at the extent of the abuse of power by our “trusted civil servants.” –

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Posted by at 02:44 | Posted in Measure 37 | 18 Comments |Email This Post Email This Post |Print This Post Print This Post
  • Jed Redneck

    So the taxpayers should be happy about having to give away $300K?

    • Steve Plunk

      That is a problem isn’t it? Perhaps we should force the bureaucrats to pay personally for such transgressions. In the mean time people need to lose their jobs.

      • come again?

        State police “bureaucrats?” Make sure to call them that the next time they pull you out of a wreck or answer your 911 call.

        • Steve Plunk

          I doubt the legal staff of the OSP or Attorney Generals office will do either. Let’s not let these people hide behind the heroic facade. These were bureaucrats abusing their power.

          Besides, I pay the patrol officers to answer 911 calls and work the streets. They don’t volunteer you know.

  • Bob Clark

    Hey, off the subject, but could one pick up a No on 66 and 67 bumper sticker at the E club meeting this Wednesday?

    As for Clapper & game hunting:
    I kind of feel bad about the killed animals but I’m just a twinkie who’s spent most of his life in the city, eating an occasional burger with real meat trying to forget where the meat comes from. What was it clinton said about making sausage? You don’t have to know how the sausage is made to know you like the taste of it.

  • Bob Tiernan

    *Jed Redneck:*

    So the taxpayers should be happy about having to give away $300K?

    *Bob T:*

    That’s the problem with lawsuits against government: the people who prove to
    be responsible for the wrongdoing never personally pay the damages or get
    properly punished. So here we have taxpayers footing the bill but the people
    responsible should get fired as well for they cost us that $300,000.

    Any employee who costs us such a large amount of money should be fired.

    Bob Tiernan
    Portland

    • Diamond Jim

      Bob is right. These morons should not be working.

    • come again

      OK, but I guess by that logic any time the government prevails in a law suit the employee who won the case should get a big fat bonus right?

      • Steve Plunk

        Flawed logic. Doing your job and obeying the law does not entitle you to extra benefits. Breaking the law and failing your employer should bring dismissal.

        • come again

          Breaking the law? If anyone broke the law they should be prosecuted. You have evidence?

          It seems Steve, you have a standard for failure but not one for success. I’m glad I don’t work for you.

          • Steve Plunk

            By all appearances the large settlement indicates the law was broken.

            An employee’s success is why they are paid. It seems the public sector stance now is getting paid for not doing anything wrong? How about doing something right? How about being productive?

            I have to ask, are you private sector or public sector? Obviously I’m private sector so I think it’s fair to ask.

          • come again?

            I’m in the private sector and have been most of my adult life. Have worked for others and owned my own business many years. Private businesses worth working for (in my opinion and that of many business consultants) include profit sharing and/or bonuses in addition to base pay and benefits. If I bring a lot of new clients into the firm I work for, you can darn well be sure I’ll get rewarded for that financially, and in fact just was. Otherwise I would take my tush to someone elses cubicle.

            Public sector employment, which I have also dabbled in, usually has no financial incentives for going above and beyond (higher managers being the exception). This limits incentive to step up, and given civil service and union rules, its very hard to fire public employees for mediocre, or average performance. You want better performing government workers, give them a carrot in the form of bonuses. You want mediocrity, follow your advice.

            You say by “all appearances” the law was broken. If that is the case then whoever is alleged to have broken it should be prosecuted. Public employees are as subject to the law as the rest of us.

  • Bob Tiernan

    *come again:*

    Breaking the law? If anyone broke the law they should be prosecuted. You have evidence?

    *Bob T:*

    It’s not a case of breaking a law, but of costing money through one’s irresponsible actions. After all, a window wholesale business will fire an employee who costs them money due to his clumsiness that breaks scores of windows each work. No law breaking involved.

    Bob Tiernan
    Portland

    • come again?

      Steve stated in several posts that the employees in question broke the law. My response was to his assertion.

      In business, sometimes employees screw something up and cost a company money. Sometimes they do something great and earn the company money. A good employer figures out who on the staff tend to do the latter more than they do the former, and they keep these people on. A stupid employer fires someone for a single screw up regardless of their record.

      But here we have Steve and others ranting that employees who may have screwed up in this case should be fired…period…no questions asked. This is total BS. You could have an employee with a 30 year track record of success with this one screw up. They should be fired? Ridiculous.

      Yes, if an employee breaks windows routinely they won’t last long. That is also true for public employees. Screw ups are weeded out, though if they belong to a union that takes a while. Same is true in the private sector.

  • Bob Tiernan

    *come again?:*

    Steve stated in several posts that the employees in question broke the law. My response was to his assertion.

    *Bob T:*

    Fine — point is that the breaking of laws should not be the line at which
    these people should be fired. The line should be a lot lower than that.

    Bob Tiernan
    Portland

    • come gain?

      Fire people when they cost you money in the aggregate, not when they cost you money in one incident. Otherwise you are just being reactive.

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