The Republican Party is Dead.

Goodbye. Farewell. So long. Hasta luego.

The sad display of the tired, old, out-of-touch, feeble, eviscerated, brain-dead, oafish, thick-witted, witless, moronic, vacuous, self-centered Republican guard standing tall against Christine O’Donnell spelled the end of the Grand Old Party.

Those who said she could not win were fools. Those who say she now cannot win are fools. They don’t know she can’t win. They don’t much or they would not have come out against her. They don’t know much about anything anymore as they are now wrong far more than they are right. They are ignorant and impotent and soon will become irrelevant.

Here is what to do about the dying Republican Party.

1. If they tell you to vote for someone, vote for someone else.
2. If they ask you for money, send it instead to the Tea Party or Wounded Warriors.
3. If they send you any mail with postage paid return envelopes, stuff them as full and as heavy as you can and send them back.
4. If they tell you anything simply ignore them because they will be proven wrong.
5. Laugh at them. Everyone else is. You may as well have some fun.

They are dead wrong and are officially over.

It wasn’t even fun while it lasted.

Vote with your heart and your mind – not with the party. That is the only way to reclaim America.

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  • Wayne Brady

    The RNC, NRCC, and NRSC do not represent the Republican Party. Look for big changes in these organizations next year when the true Republicans sweep out the old guard.

    We cannot give up on the Republican Party. We need to take back these organizations that claim to represent Republicans. The real Republicans are Marco Rubio, Sharron Angle, Jim DeMint, Paul Ryan, and others like them.

  • paul

    I am a Republican. I’ve always been a Republican. I give to the Republican Party. I support Republican candidates. I’m not amused by these “Johnny-come-lately” one issue voters who try to tell us how vote; those of us who have been trying to work within the GOP to move the party back to the right, where it used to be.
    This Jerry Dawson is advocating is the same thing that caused Clinton to be elected, when third party candidate Ross Perot took away so many votes from the Republican candidate.
    Don’ fall for these people like this fellow. Vote Republican – the party of personal responsibility. The party with the best answers for the future.

    • Steve Lindsey

      Oh Castle was a GREAT Republican was he?

      Well if you think voting with Obama 80% of the time as being a Great Republican then well yes he was.

    • Anonymous

      so, I take it you are going to support O’Donnell now that she is the nominee and favored by a majority of the party now, eh?

  • Anonymous

    “It is not enough to be abstinent with other people, you also have to be be abstinent alone. The Bible says that lust in your heart is committing adultery, so you can’t masturbate without lust.” ~Christine O’Donnell

    Stop “committing adultery” with Christine, Jerry, it’s undignified.

  • Bob Clark

    When you fellow conservatives are feeling down on the GOP, all you need to do is go to YouTube, pull up Ronald Reagan’s oratory(s) like “Those Choices Don’t Speak For the Rest of US.” Ronald Reagan was defeated in 1976 by Gerald Ford the establishment candidate but through perservance and a Tea Party like belief in individual initiative, responsibilty and reward, he came back to win in 1980 launching an American renasissance unseen in the 20th century.

    God Love, Reagan and his belief in leading the GOP to reborn glory. The party of Abraham Lincoln no less.

  • Anonymous

    “tired, old, out-of-touch, feeble, eviscerated, brain-dead, oafish, thick-witted, witless, moronic, vacuous, self-centered”

    That’s you, Jerry. Welcome back!

  • John Fairplay

    I understand and share your excitement over Primary victories by conservative candidates, but this is a pretty silly post, actually. The Republican Party is not only not dead, but it has candidates running in races all across the country. It would not even be accurate to say that what has been derisively known as the “country club” or “establishment” wing of the Party is dead – after all, John McCain won his Primary as have plenty of other “establishment” Republican candidates. I’m not sure anyone would argue that Chris Dudley was the most conservative candidate in the Gubernatorial Primary…was Scott Bruun? Rob Cornilles? More importantly, perhaps, the conservative candidates who have won are not going to win in November without the votes of “establishment” Republicans, so I really don’t get the “stick a finger in their eye” strategy you’re employing here.

  • Anonymous

    “Here is what to do about the dying Republican Party.

    1. If they tell you to vote for someone, vote for someone else.”

    Yup, will be voting for Kitzhaber!

    • Pinkie French

      why? What is John going to bring to the table that he did not last time? Greece ringing any bells???? Because if we continue on the path we are on….

      • Anonymous

        Just following my idol Jerry!

        Actually, I don’t like either candidate. I really haven’t made up my mind.

  • Steve Plunk

    I like to think the Party is evolving rather than dead. It’s evolving in the right direction and if the leadership pays attention it will do so in an orderly fashion. Senators have thrown their support behind O’Donnell and even the RNC has straightened up. Hang in there Jerry, I think things will work out.

    • Ron Marquez

      …..”It’s evolving in the right direction and if the leadership pays attention”…..

      Just like they’re paying attention to Paul Ryan ? The senior GOP leadership will not only not endorse Ryan’s “Roadmap to America’s Future”, they’ll barely acknowledge it’s existence.

      Unless the McConnels and Boehners can demonstrate they understand what conservative America expects of them, any GOP rise to power will be short lived.

      • Steve Plunk

        You’re right, they still have a lot to learn from the likes of Ryan and Cantor. We should be pressuring those old timers to start listening to the new ideas and also recognize the new power of the Tea Party. It’s the spending stupid should be our clarion call across the country.

  • Bob Tiernan

    *Paul:*

    Ross Perot took away so many votes from the Republican candidate.

    *Bob T:*

    No he didn’t. Bush 41 gave them away. Gave them no reason to vote for
    him again. His son was just as stupid. Bush 43 and his Repub legislative
    partners allowed the Dems to take the fiscal responsibility issue away from
    them (for a time). That takes real stupidity.

    Bob Tiernan
    Portland

    • paul

      to the “other Bob Tiernan”: There were enough Republicans who would have voted for any Republican if Perot hadn’t tried the “third party” route. I’m sure that Chairman Bob Tiernan would agree.

  • Rupert in Springfield

    Personally I am glad to see the possible end of the Mike Castle brand of Republican. I am one of those who thinks that a RINO is actually worse for Republicans than a Democrat in the same position. When you have people of the Olympia Snow type who consistently snatch defeat from the jaws of victory it dispirits the party and turns Republicans off more than an opposition party member would.

    Was Mike Castle that? A lot of people said he was. The point is people in general are sick of the direction the country is going in and Republicans are especially tired of those party members who have helped to get us here.

    The Tea Party has been wildly successful. More so than I would have ever expected. Will their message get through to Republicans should they be as successful in November as many think? Time will tell, but they certainly will increase their numbers.

    I think most Republicans know that the party is on trial after the failure to hold the line on spending under Bush2. If they gain in numbers, especially should they gain a majority in either house, the spotlight will be on them to restrain both government spending and its scope of influence.

    Any idiot should understand that immedeatly upon election, a Republican Senator or Representative will be urged by the press to work in a spirit of compromise, of bipartisanship. This does not attend to Democrats – Pelosi became speaker to fight Bush2. Any journalist who suggested that now she was speaker, she should work with the president to help pass his agenda would have been thought a lunatic. Not so with Republicans. The day after the election the Washington press corps will have little questions at the news conference other than how will Republicans compromise and work with the president to help with his agenda.

    The congressman who does so will be lauded by the press. Should Republicans have a majority they will be cheered by the press whenever they accede to Obamas spending habits.

    That will go on until two months before election day in 2012.

    Then those same Republicans will be portrayed as spend thrifts, not as the bipartisan giants they had grown accustomed to being called by the press.

    Will Republicans learn the lessons of 2006 that were the opening act to the two year national nightmare the nation has now endured?

    Possibly. But one does have to remember Republicans are the stupid party. Learning what works for them seems to be an impossible lesson. For Republicans, the ineluctable draw of bipartisan moderation for some reason has the gravitational pull of a black hole once an election is won.

  • Rupert in Springfield

    And this comment pretty much sums things up as regards the Republican party.

    From Bill Clinton at a Dem fundraiser in Minneapolis on Tuesday, speaking about Bush2

    “A lot of their candidates today, they make him look like a liberal,”

    That’s right Big Bill, you have lurched into the obvious.

    In case you missed the news Bill, neither Bush was a conservative. Both were moderate Republicans. We all know how history has looked upon them.

  • Anonymous

    You Tea Partiers are going to find out in November that winning a primary is not the same thing as winning a general election. The Republican/Tea Party is indeed dead — from the neck up.

    • Steve Lindsey

      I would rather lose with my PRINCIPLES intact. Then Win as a RINO with none.

      • Anonymous

        Things ought to work out well for you then.

    • Anonymous

      Is that why in FL the tea party candidate Rubio is 16 points ahead of the sitting “moderate” governor who in turn is 10 points ahead of the DEMOCRAT?

    • Steve Plunk

      Anon 18:33,

      School yard taunts really don’t count for much. I have no crystal ball and cannot foresee what the vote will be like in November with accuracy like you. I do know the mood of the country has changed substantially and the shine has worn off the hope and change of Obama, Pelosi, and Reid.

      Perhaps you could enlighten us with real thinking rather than just saying we’re dead “from the neck up”. A little reasonable and rational thought from the Left would be a pleasant change.

      • Anonymous

        See #13 below. The name-calling started with Jerry’s article, not the commenter. But as a tag-team you and Jerry are back to form!

        • Steve Plunk

          That’s your reasonable and rational thought? Jerry started it? I meant explain why you think November will be a loss for the Republican and why we are all dead from the neck up. What exactly is wrong with our thinking?

          BTW, I respectfully disagree with Jerry’s post. How do we tag team while we disagree?

          • Anonymous

            It’s this: one guy (Jerry) starts off with a bunch of nasty cracks against people he dislikes, in this case, the mainstream Republican party.

            Then, someone else, not especially taking to this, comes back with some nasty cracks of his own.

            Then, the second member of the tag team (Plunk) comes up with the usual smarmy entreaties to be reasonbable, respectful:

            “A little reasonable and rational thought from the Left would be a pleasant change.”

            In other words, throw the nasty stuff, when somebody throws a little back, time for the self-righteous act.

          • valley p

            The Republicans will win net seats in November. They will probably re-take a majority in the House. The question you should be asking yourselves is “then what?”

            Your program, such as it is, is to cut taxes further and also “cut spending.” We know from history that cutting taxes is the easy part. No one ever opposes having their taxes cut. But cutting spending?

            The 2010 federal budget breaks down as follows:
            20% is Social Security. Not a single tea partier has called for cutting current SSI payments.
            19% is Defense spending. Not a single tea partier has called for cutting defense.
            16% is unemployment, food stamps, welfare, and other social spending. How much of that can and will you cut?
            13% is Medicare. We know from Tea Party demonstrations they don’t want that cut.
            8% is Medicaid. Cut that? I don;t think so.
            4% is interest on the naitonal debt. Can’t cut that.
            2% is transportation spending, financed by the gas tax. You want to cut that? I didn’t think so.
            The rest, around 8%, is everything else. national parks and forests, food inspection, ports, homeland security, State department, foreign aid, and so forth. In other words, all the stuff the government actually does day to day to keep things running along.

            So here is your problem. You win the House and you have to pass a budget. You cut taxes, and you can’t make more than a small dent in spending. You are right back to the Bush-Bush, and Reagan Administrations. You have learned nothing, and you will repeat the same mistakes that created the mess we are in.

            So tell me Steve…what is the program?

          • Steve Plunk

            The first order of business for a possible new Republican majority is to stop any more of the insane Obama programs. Cap and Trade, Card Check, and whatever else is up their sleeves. The fact is as much as people deride gridlock if you’re keeping bad legislation from passing that’s good gridlock.

            The Republicans should realize that American business is and has always been the engine that drives our prosperity, technical advances, medical advances, and prestige in the world. For decades government at all levels have treated business as a cow to milked or a menace to society. It’s neither. Pro business policies and legislation is the way to 1) restore the economy 2) grow the economy enough to increase tax revenues without increasing tax rates 3) restore our nations competitiveness globally 4) Provide a future filled with optimism versus the pessimism we see now. I can’t help but see previous generations making their fortunes in a vibrant US economy yet now those generations have handicapped the economy for future generations with excessive taxes and regulations. Especially the regulations.

            Everything flows from economic success therefore the economy should be job one.

            I hope our gaggle of anons out there read this and see you can post something without snark and make a point.

          • valley p

            “1) restore the economy”

            Restore it to what? Growth? Already happening. Are you going to restore the value of homes to what they were in 2006 so that people can borrow against them again? What is “restore the economy?” And how would you go about it?

            2) “grow the economy enough to increase tax revenues without increasing tax rates ”

            Great. We are back to supply side economics, which did not work the first or second time it was tried, but will work now. Brilliant.

            3) “restore our nations competitiveness globally”

            Great idea. What is the program for doing so? More free trade with China? More tax cuts on businesses that export jobs? What?

            4) “Provide a future filled with optimism versus the pessimism we see now.”

            There you go. 2 years of fear mongering over the future and now you will restore optimism? How? By celebrating Chritine O’Donnel as Senator and Sarah Palin as president? That is going to make people optimistic?

            So Steve…by not naming a single program or area of spending you would cut, you expose the hollowness of your Tea Party nonsense.

          • Steve Plunk

            1) Robust economic growth rather then the accepted ‘anemic’ growth.

            2) No we haven’t tried it. Regulatory schemes have advanced steadily for decades. The has been no substantial retreat even when the rules are judged to be worthless and counterproductive.

            3) Reread the post for the answer.

            4) One must first recognize the problem (pessimism) in order to offer corrective alternatives (optimism). That’s real world business thinking. Prepare for the worst and hope for the best.

            My point is if we grow the economy the cuts will not need to be so deep. The same way a single person can improve his financial fortunes and afford better things while paying off debt a country can improve it’s financial success by earning more. What is so hard to understand about that?

          • valley p

            Its magic talk Steve. Yes, we can “grow” our way out of deficits, but only if growth occurs and spending is held in check. Which parts of spending are you planning to hold in check? Over what time period? Ryan’s plan, which does exactly as you suggest by continuing to cut taxes and not really cut spending except way off in the future, does not close the budget deficit according to the CBO.

            We had one short period with no budget deficit in the past 40 years. It was under a democratic president who raised taxes AND had an economic boom. That is the formula. You can’t cut taxes and reduce the deficit. Its not remotely possible.

            You and the tea party are offering exactly, program for program, what the Republican party did under Bush 2. It is mass insanity to think you will get a different result.

          • Anonymous

            “I hope our gaggle of anons out there read this and see you can post something without snark and make a point.”

            Well, I can see that you just used a whole lot of words to say nothing. And that you managed not to spew any misguided hatred for pubic employees throughout your entire comment, so that’s pretty good. I guess.

          • Steve Plunk

            Pointing out irresponsible behavior by public employees and their unions is not misguided hatred, it’s a public service. You failed to post anything to counter my points so I would assume you have nothing of substance to contribute.

          • Anonymous

            So now you’re a public servant! For talking trash like “For decades government at all levels have treated business as a cow to milked or a menace to society.”

          • Anonymous

            Save it, Steve. “Pointing out irresponsible behavior” is one thing, but your over the top, vendetta-esque hatred for public employees is irrational and makes you seem like a wacko (which I do not believe you are).

            And, no, I don’t have much to contribute. valley p refudiated your talking points to my satisfaction; besides which there isn’t much to debate in my mind. Return to Clinton era tax rates, repeal NAFTA, kill Obamacare, and transition to a single-payer healthcare system. None of this is going to happen. We all know this. The only reason I pay attention to “politics” is for the entertainment value it provides.

          • Anonymous

            What makes you think he is not as wacko as he seems?

            I don’t know his personal circumstances, but the wackoesqueness makes me think of a guy at a local workout club. This guy is a businessman. He complains all the time about how put upon he is by the government. He complains constantly about public workers who retire in their late 50’s. And guess what? This guy at the club inherited a business from his father who retired in his late 50’s! When his business history is pointed out to him, he acts as if he had earned every penny of what he has.

          • Anonymous

            “The Republicans should realize that American business is and has always been the engine that drives our prosperity, technical advances, medical advances, and prestige in the world. For decades government at all levels have treated business as a cow to milked or a menace to society.”

            Sounds pretty snarky to me! And your worship of business is beyond absurd. I think you left out a few things. The Gettysburg Address? Declaration of Independence? Manhattan Project? The Hubble Space Telescope? The Internet? A couple of hundred Nobel prizes? And business has been treated badly in this country? You should be ashamed of yourself!

          • Steve Plunk

            Recognizing the role of American business and industry is not worshiping it. From business flows the very funds that pay for colleges and universities and NASA. I’m not sure what the Gettysburg address and the Declaration of Independence are doing on your list but the declaration was written by colonial businessmen and the address by a single man who was a private attorney before he became president.

            I’m not quite sure why I should be ashamed of myself for pointing out the obvious facts. I produce, I contribute by paying wages and taxes. I have nothing to be ashamed of by pointing out the government has gone too far in it’s confiscation of private wealth and it’s regulations that deprive men of making it in the first place. Taking a stand for my fellow citizens is far from shameful.

          • Anonymous

            That the economy provides the financial means for the country is almost a tautology. That’s a far cry from attributing ever great accomplishment to business. A very big step to credit business with our medical advances.

            What do the Gettsysburg Address and the Declaration of Independence have to do with things? I have a feeling they have something to do with our “prestige in the world”. A lot more than, say, the TARP package or even Microsoft Office. Was Jefferson a businessman? If you consider inheriting thousands of acres and a gaggle of slaves, then yes. A gentleman farmer might be more like it. But somehow that is not what he’s remembered for, not the part that contributes to our national prestige. Lincoln the small-time lawyer a businessman? If you insist. Again, not what he’s remembered for. I don’t think that’s what you’ll read about at the Lincoln memorial.

            What you should be ashamed of is your preposterous claim of persecution of business in this country, and also your personal pose of the mistreated businessman, who actually is a benefactor and defender of humanity! You’d think you were Mother Theresa or something. It must be nice to be so smug. Especially given your hatred of government and public workers. Speaking of which: I’m reminded that those guys who ran into the WTC — government workers — are far more deserving of admiration than almost any businessman will ever be.

          • valley p

            Well stated anon. The private sector was running out of the buildings while the public sector ran in. And when it came to fighting terrorists, it has been the public sector all the way except for the private contractors living off the public purse.

            What Steve and people like him fail to recognize is that there would be no private sector without the public sector. There would be Feudalism.

  • Richard Brown

    “The sad display of the tired, old, out-of-touch, feeble, eviscerated, brain-dead, oafish, thick-witted, witless, moronic, vacuous, self-centered Republican guard standing tall against Christine O’Donnell spelled the end of the Grand Old Party.”

    How immature of you I expect this type of name calling from a eight year old not an adult. Behold this is what we got from the death of intellectualism in the conservative movement and the dominance of low conservatism by Talk radio and the tea party. It way I decided to no longer be a precinct person fro Washington County and almost left the republican party.
    The tragidy of all this is the GOP could counter and put the tea party on the spot by taking a a principal position based on capitalism and individual liberty instead of protecting the institution an d political pragmatism.

    • Jerry

      It is not name calling if it is true. The old guard is OUT.
      Vive la revolucion!

    • Rupert in Springfield

      >The tragidy of all this is the GOP could counter and put the tea party on the spot by taking a a principal position based on capitalism and individual liberty instead of protecting the institution an d political pragmatism.

      Isn’t that what the teaparty is forcing blue blood Republicans to do?

      Wouldn’t standard political pragmatism have been to look at the election of 2010 and immediately try to make nice nice with Obama?

      The exact opposite was done. The politically pragmatic was challenged. Frankly given the Republicans standing going into the election it seems to be working.

      • valley p

        “Wouldn’t standard political pragmatism have been to look at the election of 2010 and immediately try to make nice nice with Obama?”

        Not necessarily. but it would include avoiding hysteria, branding him as a foreign born Muslim-Fascist-Socialist (never mind all the contradictions) and over reacting to a pretty modest agenda (i.e. save the banking system and auto companies and extend health insurance to more Americans) by rushing headlong off a cliff.

        Political pragmatism includes creating a coherent, workable, and achievable agenda. It does not mean adopting the other side’s agenda. But tell me, what exactly within the “Tea Party” amounts to a coherent, workable, and achievable agenda? “cutting spending” is a bumper sticker, not a program. “Constitutional government” is what we already have. Nominating serially unemployed, whacked out sex scolds like Christine O’Donnell is a sign that the “Tea Party” cares more about political symbolism and retribution than about governing. Maybe they should adopt the guillotine as their party symbol. That would send a message. There are now 9 Republican establishment heads in the basket, most of them not even moderates let alone liberals.

      • Anonymous

        No try to open a private business on private property and fly a Mexican flag and hire a few Mexicans the see how committed the tea party is to individual rights (trade) and capitalism. The noting my the a statist manifestation of populism.

        • Steve Plunk

          We have such businesses here in Medford. So far no Tea Party protest have occurred. Your hypothetical example fails. BTW, were the hires in your scenario legal or illegal immigrants?

  • eagle eye

    So many comments for a post by Jerry!

    • a retired professor

      Much Ado About Nothing. A good way to start the school year!

    • Bud

      His posts almost always generate more comments than most.

      • Anonymous

        Nothing like a buffoon to generate boffo box office!

      • valley p

        That’s our Jerry! The penultimate late middle age conservative white guy revolutionary throwing stink bombs into the crowd just to get a response. A modern day Abbie Hoffman. We love him.

        • eagle eye

          penultimate?

          • valley p

            Sure. You don’t think he will be the last of his kind do you?

          • Anonymous

            Well, there’s Peter DeFazio. But penultimate? I think there’s a never-ending supply!

          • Anonymous

            Huh? DeFazio?

          • Anonymous

            “late middle age conservative white guy revolutionary throwing stink bombs into the crowd just to get a response.”

            Maybe not the usual “conservative”, but a thoroughly conventional guy pretending to be otherwise. A nice fit for his congressional district.

            I wonder what % of the vote Art Robinson will get? Now there’s a real screwball!

  • Anonymous

    Interesting. I’ve always thought of DeFazio as a what-you-see-is-what-you-get type of guy, and it would never occur to me to mention his name in connection with the buffoon known as Jerry Dawson.

    Agreed on Robinson though, that guy is off the charts. My guess is 20% if he (and we) are lucky.

    • Anonymous

      I admit, comparing DeFazio with Jerry is a stretch! But “late middle age conservative white guy revolutionary throwing stink bombs into the crowd just to get a response” did make DeFazio come to mind.

      • valley p

        I’m not saying Jerry is the only guy on earth who fits that description. But it does fit him pretty well no?

        • eagle eye

          Can’t speak for Anon, but for myself, have to admit, it does fit Jerry. But we have to admit as well that our Jerry is a very special case!

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