Exec’s PERS not hurt by her DMV computer system failure

Americans For Prosperity – Oregon

AFP Pension Reform TV Ad Focuses on DMV Official Whose Agency Cost Taxpayers $70 Million in Cost Overruns for Computer System that Couldn’t Be Used

Sublimity – With States across America reforming the way government employees are compensated, AFP-Oregon today continued its ten-week television ad project to educate Oregonians about problems with the State’s Public Employee Retirement System (PERS) and to urge reform of the system during the 2011 Legislative Session.  The series will highlight some of the public officials who have cost taxpayers millions in cost overruns on public projects or lawsuit settlements, or have been accused of self-dealing, and are now eligible for generous pensions – all financed by the hard-working families of Oregon.   Viewers are encouraged to visit this website to learn more, and to contact their Legislators to demand reform of the troubled retirement system.

The fourth ad in this series, which begins running today, features former State Legislator Jane Cease.  Cease had served 13 years in the State Legislature when she was appointed to run the State’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).  During her tenure, Cease approved spending more than $70 million in cost overruns on a new computer system for the Agency.  The system never worked, and the cost ballooned from an original $50 million price tag to $123 million, and was eventually scrapped – a total loss for taxpayers.  Despite this epic failure, Cease requested and was given another high-paying government job.  Under Oregon law, Ms. Cease’s 13 years in the Legislature will be credited as though she were paid at her highest three-year government salary during that time.

 

“Taxpayers in our state are struggling under a growing burden from PERS,” noted AFP-Oregon State Director Jeff Kropf.  “For too long, the Legislature and the Governor have failed to act to curb double-dipping and self-dealing.  It’s time for strong action that will remove Legislators, the Governor and Oregon Judges from PERS, and require all government employees to pay at least 6 percent of their salaries into their ownretirement plans.  Without these and other steps, PERS will continue to be an albatross around the neck of Oregon’s private sector.”

 

The AFP-Oregon ads are running in media markets across the State.


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Posted by at 01:05 | Posted in Public Employees Retirement System | 13 Comments |Email This Post Email This Post |Print This Post Print This Post
  • Fatandhappy

    This fine woman, who should not be chastised, simply was in over her head. These computer systems are big and are hard to figure out. No other state has ever solved the DMV computer problem. It is simply too big. No company would be able to solve it, which is why this fine employee went to some unknown fool to solve the problem. There is no way IBM could have figured this one out.
    Please leave her in peace to reap from the trough – she has earned it.

    • Libs Need To Be Dumped!

      Sorry but most of us don’t “buy” your load of excuses for that pig Jane Cease. Instead of trying to re-invent the wheel, Ms. Cease should have contacted other state DMV agencies to see if any had a computr system that provided some or most of the functions the State of Oregon wanted for the DMV computer system.
      Instead, this clueless political hack had a “sales job” done on her as well as other rubes at Oregon DMV. They were also too stupid to demand a “performance clause” in the contract requiring the system to fully function before the vendor got paid.
      Even more interesting, that worthless pig of a newspaper in Portland sometimes publishes a picture of the old bag – a clear indication that she has no shame whatsoever of showing her worthless face in public. You can also thank your current re-tread for apointing her to the DMV and to other jobs as well.

    • Ron Marquez

      This is surely tongue-in-cheek or has been posted by the AFSCME and/or SEIU leadership.

    • Ron Marquez

      This is surely tongue-in-cheek or has been posted by the AFSCME and/or SEIU leadership.

  • wnd

    Perhaps the SEIU, OEA and AFSCME should carry Jane Cease’s PERS and the COLA contained therein.

    Seen from private sector nickel-seats; They appear to have PLENTY OF MONEY FOR DRIVING their ambitions (pedal to meddle) thunderously over an oval track of richly rewarding fiscal left turns only.

    IMO, their ‘checkered’ flag should be replaced with a crimson one denoting “Cease and Desist Immediately!”

  • wnd

    Perhaps the SEIU, OEA and AFSCME should carry Jane Cease’s PERS and the COLA contained therein.

    Seen from private sector nickel-seats; They appear to have PLENTY OF MONEY FOR DRIVING their ambitions (pedal to meddle) thunderously over an oval track of richly rewarding fiscal left turns only.

    IMO, their ‘checkered’ flag should be replaced with a crimson one denoting “Cease and Desist Immediately!”

  • Bob Clark

    This case illustrates why state government employees should not earn as much as private sector employees. Because state employees are not likely to be terminated for inept performance or weak performance after the customary first year probationary period.

    One fair alternative to using high three to establish pension payout would be this: Average the PERS receipient’s annual salary for all service years adjusted for general inflation to the year of retirement. That is, convert the average salary into present day dollars. It is not really fair to use the nominal salary from like 1980 for instance without some adjustment for inflation.

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