Top 20 Oregon public safety bills

OREGON ANTI-CRIME ALLIANCE

TOP 20 SCORECARD BILLS FOR THE 2011 LEGISLATIVE SESSION

by Doug Harcleroad, Senior Policy Advisor

The goal of the OAA is for Oregon to be one of the five safest states in terms of low crime rates.  To that end, the OAA supports or opposes legislation depending on how it effects this goal.  In short, is the bill good for the public safety of Oregonians or not?  Listed below are our top 20 picks for bills we supported or opposed and what actually happened to them in the 2011 session.  For a variety of reasons, the OAA’s position was the legislatures’ position in 18 out of the 20 bills.  We believe the 2011 legislative session was a good one for the public safety of Oregonians.

HB 2103:  Prohibits individuals participating in a drunken driver diversion program from consuming intoxicants including alcohol.  Allows participants to use state medical assistance program to pay for treatment, if they are on the program.  OAA supported.  Effective date June 23, 2011.

HB 2423:  Continued the suspension of voter-passed longer penitentiary sentences for repeat property and drug offenders.  OAA opposed.  Bill died in committee.

HB 2424:  Delayed the implementation of voter-passed mandatory minimum sentences (Measure 73) for third-time-convicted drunken drivers and repeat sex offenders for two years to save money.  OAA opposed.  Bill died in committee.

HB 2663:  The prosecuting attorney must make a reasonable effort to consult with the crime victim before making a plea offer and before entering into a final plea agreement in all cases involving a violent felony.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective August 2, 2011.

HB 2702:  Makes it easier for active military person charged with drunken driving to enter and complete a diversion program.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective June 1, 2011.

HB 2714:  Creates the crime of Patronizing a Prostitute with a minimum fine of $10,000 for a first offense and a $20,000 fine for a second or subsequent offense.  Also a minimum of 7 days in jail for a second offense and 30 days in jail for a third or subsequent offense.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective January 1, 2012.

HB 2721:  Eliminates reliance on spiritual treatment as a defense to serious crimes against a child under 18 years old.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective June 9, 2011.

HB 2940:  Increases, under specified circumstances, penalty for crime of strangulation to maximum of 5 years’ imprisonment, $125,000, or both.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective date January 1, 2012.

HB 3065:  Under specified circumstances, increases the penalty for Official Misconduct in the First Degree to a maximum of 5 years’ imprisonment, $125,000, or both.  OAA supported.  Bill died in committee.

HB 3075:  Requires all offenders in intoxicated driver diversion programs who have a driver’s license to install an approved ignition interlock device on any vehicle they drive.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective date January 1, 2012.

HB 3085:  Requires health care facility, such as a hospital, to notify law enforcement if facility becomes aware, as a result of a blood test, that patient who was operating a motor vehicle in accident has controlled substance in their blood.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective date January 1, 2012.

HB 3309:  As part of re-entry of ex-offenders into society, this bill allows the Department of Corrections to establish on-the-job training programs for ex-offenders.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective date August 2, 2011.

SB 371:  Adopts 15% earned time, even for offenders with mandatory minimum prison sentences.  OAA opposed.  Bill died in committee.

SB 393 and SB 394:  Provided that offenders sentenced to mandatory minimum terms of imprisonment for certain person crimes committed when they were 15, 16, or 17 years of age are eligible for conditional release hearing (second look) after having served one-half of sentence imposed.  OAA opposed.  Bills died in committee.

SB 395:  Clarified the 90-day mandatory minimum of voter-passed Measure 73 for third-time-convicted drunken drivers meant 90 days and not a penitentiary sentence.  Provided funding for counties that house third time drunken drivers in jail as required by Measure 73.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective June 30, 2011.

SB 416:  With criteria, allow some non-violent presumptive prison offenders to remain in the community under high supervision and extensive services such as housing and help finding a job.  Also, provide services to ex-offenders released from prison.  OAA supported.  Bill died in committee.

SB 425:  Expands the felony crime of compelling prostitution to include knowingly aiding or facilitating the commission of prostitution by a person under 18 years of age.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective date June 14, 2011.

SB 616:  The judge is authorized to include a provision in a Family Abuse Prevention Act restraining order that protects animals of the parties from abuse or neglect.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective June 7, 2011.

SB 730:  Continue maximum of 60 days jail sentence for technical probation violation for 2 years.  It used to be 180 days.  Saves about $10 for 2 years.  OAA supported as it saved money and no “bad” incidents known during prior two years.  Bill passed.  Effective June 30, 2011.

SB 868:  Prohibits application of mandatory minimum sentences to a person who is tried as an adult for a crime committed before the person was 15 years of age.  OAA supported.  Bill passed.  Effective date June 14, 2011.

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Posted by at 11:00 | Posted in OR 76th Legislative Session | 2 Comments |Email This Post Email This Post |Print This Post Print This Post
  • JR Bull

    It makes no sense to call these the top “public safety” bills. More than three times as many Oregonians die in traffic crashes than from crime.

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