Bud Pierce reacts to Kate Brown’s support of IP-28/Measure 97

Bud Pierce_thb

Bud Pierce for Governor

Salem, OR – Republican Gubernatorial Candidate Bud Pierce is disappointed, but not surprised that Gov. Kate Brown is supporting the largest sales tax increase in Oregon’s history, Measure 97, formerly called IP-28.

“The choice is clear. Kate Brown believes that the government never has enough and always wants more. I believe that the government has enough, if the government spends wisely,” said Pierce.  “If passed, this tax increase would greatly raise the cost of living in Oregon. Everyone, including low income families would be paying on average more than $1,800 per family more for goods and services. A tax increase like this will not help anyone. It will hurt low income families in Oregon the most,” said Pierce.

Pierce is a strong opponent to Measure 97, because it is a regressive gross receipts tax with the highest rate in the country, according to The Tax Foundation.

“I’m quite honestly not surprised that Brown is supporting this tax increase. It took her more than 300 days to take a stance on the measure. However, months ago she released how she would spend the money raised by this increase, which showed that she obviously supported the measure, but was afraid to take an unpopular position.” said Pierce.

“Governor Brown has sided with the entrenched special interests rather than low income and middle class Oregonians.”

Pierce also opposes Measure 97 because it does not contain specific details about where the state will spend the billions of dollars raised each year through this tax.

“I’m afraid if this measure passes, it’ll cripple Oregon’s already fragile economy. Many companies, like Powell’s Books have already said they may be forced to close their doors due to this huge tax increase. I’m against any measure that will take businesses and jobs out of our state,” said Pierce.

If it passes, Measure 97 will not just hurt businesses and jobs, it’ll hurt everyday Oregonians.

“More to the point, however, I think we should be doing everything we can to help Oregon families by cutting the tax of low- and moderate-income Oregonians. Kate Brown’s $6 billion tax hike does just the opposite in order to placate her allies in Oregon’s government employee union leadership,” said Pierce.

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Posted by at 05:00 | Posted in 2016 Election, Gov. Kate Brown, Measure 97, State Taxes | 43 Comments |Email This Post Email This Post |Print This Post Print This Post
  • DavidAppell

    What is Bud Pierce going to do about the fact that Oregon’s tax structure is regressive, and that many Oregon corporations pay little, if any, tax?

    • Gardenhomeboy

      You are wrong. “Oregon’s tax system is one of the nation’s least regressive, due to the absence of a sales tax and the inclusion of a refundable state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), said Chuck Sheketoff, executive director of the Oregon Center for Public Policy, who examined the ITEP report. Only two states, Delaware and California, and the District of Columbia have tax systems that are less regressive.” https://www.ocpp.org/2015/01/14/nr20150114-oregon-tax-system-income-inequality/

      • DavidAppell

        Try this:

        “Study: Oregon’s income tax is regressive thanks to an obscure tax break,” Oregonian 3/26/14

        https://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2014/03/study_oregons_income_tax_is_re.html

        • Gardenhomeboy

          I find it weird that your solution to the regressiveness of Oregon’s tax system, is another regressive tax.

          • DavidAppell

            How is the proposed solution regressive?

          • Gardenhomeboy

            1. Regressive https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/lro/Documents/IP%2028%20-%20RR%203-16.pdf

            2. Regressive
            https://taxfoundation.org/blog/oregon-s-gross-receipts-tax-would-be-regressive

            3. Regressive:
            https://taxfoundation.org/blog/yes-really-initiative-petition-28-would-raise-prices

            4. Regressive
            “Also, as noted, lower-income households spend a larger portion of their incomes on consumer goods than higher-income households27. Thus, taxes on the sales of consumer goods disproportionally affect lower-income consumers. While the aggregate employment and income effects of increased taxes are estimated by economic impact models such as REMI, the results do not describe how progressive or regressive the proposal may be. Any impacts to households near the bottom of the income distribution could have long-lasting effects, and should be carefully weighed against the similarly long-lasting benefits these households would reap from increased public funding.” https://media.oregonlive.com/politics_impact/other/Our%20Oregon%20Final%20Report%206-29.pdf

          • DavidAppell

            I don’t read links unless someone who cites then is courteous enough to write a half a sentence of why they’re relevant.

            Do you think it’s fair that corporations — people, my friend — pay no taxes?

          • Gardenhomeboy

            They are reports showing the tax is regressive.

            Yes, I would prefer no taxes for everyone. I am glad when people pay less taxes, all other things being equal.

          • DavidAppell

            How is it fair that corporations pay no taxes?

            Don’t they use state services?

          • Gardenhomeboy

            People to use services for their endeavors, people should pay for what they use. If you want to actually get taxes from people who should pay, I think you are aiming for the wrong entities.

          • DavidAppell

            Since corporations use services, why shouldn’t they pay for them?

          • Gardenhomeboy

            People use services. If a person creates a contract with other people and calls it a corporation, and the people who use a service or a good, they should pay for it.

            If, in your opinion that requires that rich/wealthy people pay a larger percent of their income to fund government, then so be it,

            Attempting to place a tax on a company’s sales, that ends up actually burdening working class and middle class folks more, relatively, then that is self defeating to your own paradigm.

          • DavidAppell

            I said nothing about rich people. I said that since corporations use state services, they should be taxed to pay for them.

            But, yes, the wealthy should pay a larger share of taxes than poor people.

          • DavidAppell

            “Attempting to place a tax on a company’s sales, that ends up actually burdening working class and middle class folks more, relatively, then that is self defeating to your own paradigm.”

            False assumption, in two ways:

            1) Corporations can instead decide to pay the tax by paying less dividends, or less executive salaries, thus keeping their prices low and outcompeting their competition.

            2) EVERYONE passes their taxes along. Corporations raise product prices. Workers get raises, or a different job with higher pay. Around and around it goes.

    • MrBill

      Corporations will continue to pay little, if any, tax. To them, that’s a cost of doing business that gets passed on to the customer (i.e. you and I).

      • Gardenhomeboy

        David doesn’t understand that Oregon has a pretty good tax system from the perspective of how much burden it places on poor and working class folks. It is sad to see that he can’t see past his own partisan opinions and pushes for ever increasing amounts of state revenue for people who have nearly zero accountability. His(and the Oregon Democratic party’s) idealism is getting in the way of a government that is efficient, effective, and operates within reasonable limits.

        • DavidAppell

          “Study: Oregon’s income tax is regressive thanks to an obscure tax break,” Oregonian 3/26/14

          https://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2014/03/study_oregons_income_tax_is_re.html

          • Gardenhomeboy

            So… your solution is a regressive GRT on sales? okay.

          • DavidAppell

            I haven’t advocated for a sales tax.

            Try again.

          • Gardenhomeboy

            “Perhaps the most significant disadvantage of a GRT is that it, like other sales taxes, can be markedly regressive.” (Source: Our Oregon’s very own PSU economic study https://media.oregonlive.com/politics_impact/other/Our%20Oregon%20Final%20Report%206-29.pdf)

            David, come on. You are making this too easy.

          • DavidAppell

            It isn’t a sales tax.

            It isn’t fair that corporations pay no taxes. Period.

          • Gardenhomeboy

            It is a tax on gross sales, economists agree with me not you. I am sorry you can’t get over that.

            Sorry, what does fairness have to do with this?

          • DavidAppell

            It’s a tax on corporations. On “people.”

            Corporations aren’t an “enemy.” They take up state resources and, fairly, should pay for them. More than $10/yr.

            If that means paying lower dividends, too bad for them.

          • Gardenhomeboy

            Can you articulate why this isn’t a sale tax when professional economists, who are much smarter than you or I, call it one?

          • DavidAppell

            Becauses it’s clearly a tax on corporate profits.

          • Gardenhomeboy

            Says who and why?

          • DavidAppell

            Read it.

          • Gardenhomeboy

            David, come on, This was a good convo for a while. It is obvious no amount of evidence could convince you that you are mistaken on this, or really ANY issue.

          • DavidAppell

            It that all you have left?

            I dont’ think I’m mistaken. Corporations use state services. So they should pay taxes.

            I’d also like not to be taxed. Because I’ll just pass them on.

            Deal?

          • Gardenhomeboy

            Oh David, your troll is showing.

            “Trolls come in a variety of shapes and sizes, Suler says, though the basic categories are immature teenagers, chronically angry and frustrated people who take it out on others, narcissists and sociopaths. “The hardcore troll is a sociopath who enjoys hurting people, who wants people to get upset, angry and depressed,” says Suler. “It’s a deliberate act of manipulation and control in order to feel powerful. In fact, such sociopaths want to destroy other people as best they can.”

            https://kwhs.wharton.upenn.edu/2016/08/entered-no-troll-zone/

          • DavidAppell

            When people have no real response, they often resort to calling someone a “troll.”

            Stick to the issue.

          • Gardenhomeboy

            Actually, you are trolling because when presented with expert analysis by professionals, you respond with little to nothing. No evidence, just your feelings/own biased account. You have no intention of actually being objective. You are trolling.

          • DavidAppell

            People who have no better response also accuse someone of “trolling.”

            They think they can get out of the argument that way.

          • DavidAppell

            Your link is “not found”

      • DavidAppell

        Why should corporations get away with paying little to no taxes? They’re people, aren’t they (according to Romney).

        • MrBill

          You just totally ignored what I said. To corporations (and for that matter sole proprietorships, partnerships, and co-ops), taxes are part of the cost of doing business, and that cost gets passed on to the customer.

          All taxes eventually get passed on to individuals. It all goes downhill and we’re at the bottom.

          • DavidAppell

            Not true. Corporations could choose to pay less in dividends and lower executive salaries. That keeps their prices lower than the competition, resulting in more sales hence more profits.

            Besidts that, EVERYONE’s costs get passed along.

            When workers pay more in taxes, they ask for raises. And the cycle goes around and around.

            Since corporations are supposedly “people,” they ought to be taxed as people.

          • MrBill

            You can tax them as people if you want, but the reality is they’ll pass that cost on. You can’t just dictate how much they pay in dividends or what they pay their employees (including the CEO).

            However, if you want to start your own corporation, you can surround yourself with like minded investors, and pay everyone what you think they should get from the CEO to the janitor. Good luck paying your CEO half of what he/she could get elsewhere. I’m sure you can find someone who’ll gladly do that. And I’m sure your like minded fellow investors. will be happy with a 1% rate of return.

            Yeah, good luck with that.

          • DavidAppell

            Again, EVERYONE passes their costs on.

            Why tax me? I’m just going to pass that cost along.

          • MrBill

            To whom? You’re at the bottom of the tax chain.

          • DavidAppell

            We pass our costs along by requesting higher wages. Or by requiring more taxpayer assistance to cover living expenses.

  • guest

    IP-28/Measure 97 belongs in the notorious Clinton body bag tally.

    As for Kate Brown, return her to Minnesota to arm wrestle Jesse Ventura as to who is more popular wince Garrison Keillor and/or Al Franken breaks ground in a Minnesotan grave yard, by golly.

  • Ron Swaren

    Bud Pierce could save our state. Have you noticed how the GOP finds intelligent, qualified, professional level people to run (often physicians). The Dems seem to find—well, lawyers. No comment. Now we need the splinter parties to back Pierce. Oregon could easily be back in the conservative column if they would concentrate on getting out the vote. Go, Dr. Pierce!!

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